Tax Increment Financing Has Unclear Effects

By Casey Barr Originally used in California in 1952, TIF is the most widely utilized type of economic development program in the nation, with 49 states and the District of Columbia currently authorize its use. Arizona is the only state that does not allow its use. In 2012, California limited the use of TIF after evidence … Continue reading Tax Increment Financing Has Unclear Effects

Foreclosed Properties Sold to Homeowners Stabilize Property Values

The collapse of the housing market led to an increase in the number of foreclosed residences, with ownership of many reverting to the banks. These are referred to as REO (real estate owned) properties. Recent research concludes the presence of REOs in a neighborhood can lower the property values of nearby homes, but these studies … Continue reading Foreclosed Properties Sold to Homeowners Stabilize Property Values

Anti-Price Gouging laws Hamper Storm Recovery

By Chad Thomas Prices can tell us a lot. They communicate information about the value of resources in an economy and coordinate action among a myriad of buyers and sellers, many of whom have never met. The price system often comes into question in the aftermath of a natural disaster like Hurricanes Hermine and Matthew, as … Continue reading Anti-Price Gouging laws Hamper Storm Recovery

Targeted Industry Tax Incentives in Florida

By Marisa Lupica Tax incentives are a significant but ineffective part of states’ economic development policy. As of 2012 states spent an estimated $80.4 billion annually on tax incentives for businesses. Yet, most economic research on the subject finds that targeted tax incentives are ineffective at attracting businesses, creating jobs, or improving a state’s economic … Continue reading Targeted Industry Tax Incentives in Florida