Does Digital Learning Level the Economic Playing Field for Marginalized Groups?

By Andje Louis The internet and related technologies–smartphones, computers, search engines, social media platforms–have become ingrained tools in everyday life. As more services and resources are made available online, digital inequality has come to mirror income and healthcare gaps among the world’s more marginalized populations, such as low-income and underrepresented groups.  While most people use … Continue reading Does Digital Learning Level the Economic Playing Field for Marginalized Groups?

America’s College Promises

By: Shayna Cohen In 2017, the annual cost of college in the United States, on average, was $22,432. Many students without independent support or in low-wage jobs struggle to afford higher education. Some college financing systems provide loan-free options, such as the Pell Grant offered by the federal government to low-income students, and scholarships offered … Continue reading America’s College Promises

Financing America’s Colleges: The Reality of Pell Grants

By: Shayna Cohen With approximately two out of every three high school graduates enrolled in university or college, higher education is an expectation for adults in the United States. By working hard in college, people hope to increase their social standing, job prospects, and earning potential.  However, affording the high price tag of these aspirations … Continue reading Financing America’s Colleges: The Reality of Pell Grants

Supporting Low-Income College Students: The Nonprofit Approach

By: Shayna Cohen Students from low-income households often struggle affording college without external assistance. Fortunately, several programs financially assist these students, including Pell Grants, Promise Programs, and private scholarships. Support Our Scholars, a nonprofit organization based in Winter Park, Florida, is an example of a private, nonprofit organization focused on supporting low-income students. The organization’s … Continue reading Supporting Low-Income College Students: The Nonprofit Approach

FSU’s CARE Program Combat First-Generation Student Dropout Rates

By: Shayna Cohen Students in American colleges and universities that identify as first-generation, minority, and/or low-income are at a higher risk to drop-out of college. The consequences of higher drop rates include lost consumer spending and savings, increases in the national debt, and a less-educated workforce. Students who graduate from college tend to earn more … Continue reading FSU’s CARE Program Combat First-Generation Student Dropout Rates