The Lack of Nuisance Laws in South Florida Sugarcane Farming

By: Mae Baltz In 2021, the United States produced over 33 million tons of sugarcane, with a majority of the crop harvested in the fields of Belle Glade, Florida. The city has a median household income of $28,028, with the sugar industry as one of its largest employers. As such, many of the Glade’s citizens … Continue reading The Lack of Nuisance Laws in South Florida Sugarcane Farming

Living with the Lionfish Problem: Awareness and Joint Operations

By: Joshua Durham As Florida looks inward to address ecological concerns, the lionfish invasion continues to plague coastal citizens and marine fauna. The problem has hampered both fishermen and ecological researchers in the Gulf Coast, effectively choking growth and stability on local reefs. With a growing population in the Gulf, the situation necessitates significant actions: … Continue reading Living with the Lionfish Problem: Awareness and Joint Operations

Interview with Dr. Staley: Filmmaking and Public Policy

On June 25, 2020, DeVoe L. Moore Center director Sam Staley participated in an on-line webinar on the intersection between public policy and filmmaking. The webinar was a partnership between the center, Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy, and Southern California-based film production company Korchula Productions.  Film has become an increasingly important medium for communicating … Continue reading Interview with Dr. Staley: Filmmaking and Public Policy

Anti-Price Gouging Laws Hinder Hurricane Recovery Efforts

By Giovanna da Silva Last year, Hurricanes Harvey and Irma brought price gouging back into the national spotlight. During and after Hurricane Irma, the Florida Attorney General, Pam Bondi, received over 14,000 complaints of price gouging. While there are 10 active ongoing investigations of price gouging, only one case has been resolved since December. Price … Continue reading Anti-Price Gouging Laws Hinder Hurricane Recovery Efforts

Crony Capitalism and the Rising Price of the EpiPen

By William Reynolds Monopolies are often the by-product of market failures that are induced through crony capitalist policies. Crony capitalist policies are pieces of legislation enacted to benefit politicians and private companies at the cost of the consumers. The ramifications of these policies on competitive markets can be far-reaching, and in certain instances have larger … Continue reading Crony Capitalism and the Rising Price of the EpiPen

Raising the Gas Tax Will Not Help Finance Public Infrastructure

By Giovanna da Silva As a part of his plan to revamp US public infrastructure, President Donald Trump recently suggested increasing the gasoline tax to 25 cents a gallon from the current rate of 18.4 cents per gallon to help fund his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. This isn’t a new idea, however, as proposals for … Continue reading Raising the Gas Tax Will Not Help Finance Public Infrastructure

Gentrification in Frenchtown: A Nuanced Perspective

By Jordan Greer Gentrification has been contentious since British sociologist Ruth Rich coined the word in the 1960s. Rich used the term to describe the process of wealthy citizens, landlords, and developers moving into British working class neighborhoods and renovating the area. This process of redevelopment, she argued, drove up the costs of housing and … Continue reading Gentrification in Frenchtown: A Nuanced Perspective

Entrepreneur Develops Technology to Monitor Police Interactions

By Leesa Newbon and Giovanna da Silva Transparency and government accountability are considered essential components to  maintaining a healthy democracy and reducing corruption. With the rise of  technological advancements in the digital media era, entrepreneurs can facilitate demands for transparency by developing online programs and apps that allow citizens to monitor government institutions and agencies. … Continue reading Entrepreneur Develops Technology to Monitor Police Interactions

Saudi Arabian Entrepreneur Advances Women’s Rights in the Middle East

By Kristen Carpenter and Giovanna DaSilva Earlier this year, Saudi Arabia became the first country to grant a robot by the name of Sophia full-fledged citizenship. Critics noted that while Sophia can roam the streets of the country unaccompanied, Saudi Arabia’s female citizens are not afforded this right. After all, women are still prohibited from … Continue reading Saudi Arabian Entrepreneur Advances Women’s Rights in the Middle East

The Jones Act is Sinking the Growth of American Industries

By Giovanna DaSilva The Merchant Marine Act of 1920, commonly referred to as the Jones Act, is a law enacted to protect the United States’ maritime industry, regulate commerce, and bolster national defense. While well-intentioned, the act fails to reflect the current needs of the United States. Repealing the Jones Act would prove beneficial to … Continue reading The Jones Act is Sinking the Growth of American Industries