School Choice and Charter Schools: Are Florida Children Prepared for their Futures?

By: Ethan Forberg Florida parents and students now have more control over where they want to attend school. The March 2023 signing of House Bill 1 (HB-1) means more families have access to school vouchers and fewer families will be constrained to traditional school district boundaries.  Specifically, HB-1 eliminated the income requirements for school vouchers, … Continue reading School Choice and Charter Schools: Are Florida Children Prepared for their Futures?

Living with the Lionfish Problem: Awareness and Joint Operations

By: Joshua Durham As Florida looks inward to address ecological concerns, the lionfish invasion continues to plague coastal citizens and marine fauna. The problem has hampered both fishermen and ecological researchers in the Gulf Coast, effectively choking growth and stability on local reefs. With a growing population in the Gulf, the situation necessitates significant actions: … Continue reading Living with the Lionfish Problem: Awareness and Joint Operations

Financing America’s Colleges: The Reality of Pell Grants

By: Shayna Cohen With approximately two out of every three high school graduates enrolled in university or college, higher education is an expectation for adults in the United States. By working hard in college, people hope to increase their social standing, job prospects, and earning potential.  However, affording the high price tag of these aspirations … Continue reading Financing America’s Colleges: The Reality of Pell Grants

Raising the Gas Tax Will Not Help Finance Public Infrastructure

By Giovanna da Silva As a part of his plan to revamp US public infrastructure, President Donald Trump recently suggested increasing the gasoline tax to 25 cents a gallon from the current rate of 18.4 cents per gallon to help fund his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. This isn’t a new idea, however, as proposals for … Continue reading Raising the Gas Tax Will Not Help Finance Public Infrastructure

Is the Gas Tax a Sustainable Revenue Source for Roads?

By Giovanna da Silva Millions of Americans depend on roads in their everyday lives. US roads handle 8 billion miles of traffic per day. For most of America’s contemporary history, federal, state, and local governments have maintained and funded roads. Currently, there are 4 million miles of public road in the country. Gas taxes and … Continue reading Is the Gas Tax a Sustainable Revenue Source for Roads?

Private Sector Can Shoulder Some of the Risk for New Road Construction

By Giovanna da Silva The 21st century has seen a substantial increase in public-private partnerships in the United States and around the world. The basic principle behind public-private partnerships, or P3s, is that government works with the private sector in order to build and finance public works projects. P3s have been increasingly encouraged by state … Continue reading Private Sector Can Shoulder Some of the Risk for New Road Construction

Private Toll Roads: A Case Study of Tallahassee’s Orchard Pond Parkway

By Giovanna da Silva Florida boasts the highest number of toll roads in the country. Until last April, state and local governments owned and operated all of Florida toll roads. Tallahassee’s Orchard Pond Parkway challenged this precedent, however, opening to the general public in 2017 and becoming the first privately constructed and operated toll road … Continue reading Private Toll Roads: A Case Study of Tallahassee’s Orchard Pond Parkway

Jones Act Protectionism Hinders Puerto Rican Recovery Efforts

By Giovanna da Silva On September 16, Category 5 Hurricane Maria made landfall on Puerto Rico with sustained winds of 155 miles per hour. Maria set the record as the strongest hurricane to hit the island in 89 years. With millions of displaced Puerto Ricans desperately in need of basic essentials, such as oil, food, … Continue reading Jones Act Protectionism Hinders Puerto Rican Recovery Efforts

Hurricane Response Efforts are Most Effective When Decentralized

By Chad Thomas According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), emergency responses to hurricanes aim to prevent further loss of life and  property damage. Effective emergency responses utilize local information and enable decentralized responses from within the disaster zone. Local information about necessary relief in affected areas aids response efforts. A decentralized response enables … Continue reading Hurricane Response Efforts are Most Effective When Decentralized

A Brief History of Frenchtown

By Jordan Greer With Frenchtown development becoming one of the spotlight issues in the city of Tallahassee's future economic redevelopment plans, a look at the social and economic context for this marginalized area of the city might be useful.  On July 4th 1825, the federal government granted $200,000 worth of northern Florida territory to Marquis … Continue reading A Brief History of Frenchtown

After this Hurricane Season, We Need to Rethink Flood Insurance

Giovanna Dasilva With the national spotlight on flooding caused by hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) has come under scrutiny. The federal program primarily focuses on offering flood insurance coverage and reducing the impact of flood damage.   The NFIP was established in 1968 to counteract a market failure on the … Continue reading After this Hurricane Season, We Need to Rethink Flood Insurance

Government Consolidation Rarely Lives Up to Promises

By Matt Kelly Government consolidation is an often-touted solution to economic and social problems in American cities. Several initiatives to combine local governments  have resulted in conjoined regional governments, including Indianapolis-Marion County (IN), Athens-Clarke County (GA), and Jacksonville-Duval County (FL). Tallahassee and Leon County have seen six campaigns for consolidation over 50 years, all of … Continue reading Government Consolidation Rarely Lives Up to Promises

The Per Business Regulatory Burden: Ranking Florida’s Local Governments

By Matt Kelly and Tyler Worthington The dramatic increase in federal government regulation has been well documented by economists and journalists, as has its detrimental effects on economic growth. The DeVoe Moore Center has constructed assorted measures of state and local regulatory restrictiveness. This article focused on revenues collected per business on the local level … Continue reading The Per Business Regulatory Burden: Ranking Florida’s Local Governments

Health Care and Education Departments Spend the Most of Florida’s State Budget

By: Nick Hyder and Tian Ma With 2015 behind us, it’s worthwhile to take stock of last year’s spending by state government. A state’s spending says a lot about its priorities, and accountability to taxpayers is an important component of a democracy. The Agency for Health Care Administration tops the list of spending by state … Continue reading Health Care and Education Departments Spend the Most of Florida’s State Budget

The Top 10 Highest Earning Counties in Florida

By: Igor Lukashevich and Nadia James The top six Florida counties for revenue intake per capita are as follows: Duval, Monroe, Miami-Dade, Franklin, Charlotte, and Collier. Total revenues for counties follow very closely with total expenditures, as the same six counties also topped the list for expenditures per capita. This relationship makes sense because the … Continue reading The Top 10 Highest Earning Counties in Florida

Duval county tops spending per person, followed by some of Florida’s smallest counties

By: Nick Hyder, Tian Ma, Igor Lukashevich, and Nadia James Out of the 67 counties in the state of Florida, Duval County spends the most per capita. Duval County is home to Florida’s most populous city, Jacksonville, which has a population over twice as large as Miami, Florida’s second most populous city. In 2014, Duval … Continue reading Duval county tops spending per person, followed by some of Florida’s smallest counties

EPA’s W.O.T.U.S. rule would affect much of Florida

By Tyler Worthington On June 29, 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Army Corps of Engineers added a new rule that redefined “Waters of the United States” (W.O.T.U.S.) to the Federal Register and broadened what streams, rivers, ponds, wetlands, ditches, and waterways are subject to federal regulations under the Clean Water Act. This rule marks … Continue reading EPA’s W.O.T.U.S. rule would affect much of Florida