Financing America’s Colleges: The Reality of Pell Grants

By: Shayna Cohen With approximately two out of every three high school graduates enrolled in university or college, higher education is an expectation for adults in the United States. By working hard in college, people hope to increase their social standing, job prospects, and earning potential.  However, affording the high price tag of these aspirations … Continue reading Financing America’s Colleges: The Reality of Pell Grants

Time to Revisit Private History of Mass Transit

By Giovanna Da Silva Tallahassee’s public bus transportation system, Starmetro, has been the subject of criticism among community members who use the buses. With a 3.0 star rating (out of five) on Google reviews, many complain about the poor quality of service, lack of cleanliness, tardiness, and limited bus routes and times. Complaints about public … Continue reading Time to Revisit Private History of Mass Transit

Crony Capitalism and the Rising Price of the EpiPen

By William Reynolds Monopolies are often the by-product of market failures that are induced through crony capitalist policies. Crony capitalist policies are pieces of legislation enacted to benefit politicians and private companies at the cost of the consumers. The ramifications of these policies on competitive markets can be far-reaching, and in certain instances have larger … Continue reading Crony Capitalism and the Rising Price of the EpiPen

Private Sector Can Shoulder Some of the Risk for New Road Construction

By Giovanna da Silva The 21st century has seen a substantial increase in public-private partnerships in the United States and around the world. The basic principle behind public-private partnerships, or P3s, is that government works with the private sector in order to build and finance public works projects. P3s have been increasingly encouraged by state … Continue reading Private Sector Can Shoulder Some of the Risk for New Road Construction

Israeli Consumers Would Benefit from Greater Competition in Agricultural Industry

By Kristen Carpenter A gallon of milk in Israel costs approximately $6 and eggs are priced at around $3.50. Meanwhile, the prices of milk and eggs in the United States cost consumers about half as much: $3.20 and $2.41, respectively. Israel’s high food costs can largely be attributed to the country’s arid and hilly landscape … Continue reading Israeli Consumers Would Benefit from Greater Competition in Agricultural Industry

Why the U.S. Should Adopt the Nordic Approach to Private Roads

By Giovanna da Silva Many view the United States as a free market capitalist state and Nordic countries such as Sweden and Finland as socialist due to their extensive welfare system. Yet, in the United States, most roads, highways, and other transportation infrastructure are publicly owned and operated. Meanwhile, the vast majority of roads in … Continue reading Why the U.S. Should Adopt the Nordic Approach to Private Roads

After this Hurricane Season, We Need to Rethink Flood Insurance

Giovanna Dasilva With the national spotlight on flooding caused by hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) has come under scrutiny. The federal program primarily focuses on offering flood insurance coverage and reducing the impact of flood damage.   The NFIP was established in 1968 to counteract a market failure on the … Continue reading After this Hurricane Season, We Need to Rethink Flood Insurance

Citizens Property Insurance Corporation Still Vulnerable to Underfunding

By Chad Thomas Florida’s Citizens Property Insurance Corporation (Citizens) is a state-run insurer of last resort for commercial and residential property owners unable to afford a policy in the private market. Citizens tends to insure wealthy homeowners along the coast, where property values and the risk of damage are highest. In 2002, the Florida Windstorm … Continue reading Citizens Property Insurance Corporation Still Vulnerable to Underfunding

New Study Explores Crony Capitalism in Florida

A new study published by The James Madison Institute by DeVoe L. Moore Center Policy Analyst Matthew Kelly and Center Director Samuel Staley explores two examples of crony capitalism in Florida's government policy: sports stadium subsidies and film tax incentives. The authors urge Floridians to remain vigilant over the spending of their tax dollars by government … Continue reading New Study Explores Crony Capitalism in Florida

Targeted Industry Tax Incentives in Florida

By Marisa Lupica Tax incentives are a significant but ineffective part of states’ economic development policy. As of 2012 states spent an estimated $80.4 billion annually on tax incentives for businesses. Yet, most economic research on the subject finds that targeted tax incentives are ineffective at attracting businesses, creating jobs, or improving a state’s economic … Continue reading Targeted Industry Tax Incentives in Florida